Reach Canada (TM) Equality and Justice for People with Disabilities
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Understanding Disability
Introduction | Getting the Language Right |
Definitions and Contacts | Some Canadian Highlights | Continuing Issues | De-MYTHifing the myths | The challenge

De-MYTHifying the Myths
 

Myth People with disabilities are fragile and unhealthy.
Fact  They must maintain a high level of health like everyone else. Their real concern relates to citizenship responsibility and the dignity that comes from exercising their rights.
Myth Persons with disabilities are emotionally fragile and need protection from the harsh realities of life.
Fact  Persons with disabilities are constantly adjusting, on a daily basis to difficulties that most people face only in a crisis. The point is - they make the adjustments.
Myth People with disabilities are intrinsically different from the ‘normal’ population.
Fact  What is normal? People with disabilities think, feel, and act along the same lines as other people.
Myth Persons with disabilities are exemplary human beings who always show marvellous strength of character. They are heroic and paragons of virtue.
Fact  Maybe so, but generalisations are dangerous. They are not all Beethovens, Rick Hansens or Stephen Hawkings. They’re just people.
Myth Persons with disabilities are taken care of quite comfortably by government social services.
Fact  The majority of people with disabilities live on fixed incomes that are well below poverty lines. Their lifestyles are minimalistic, defined by a constant struggle to just make ends meet. The idea of being cared for adds insult to injury.
Myth People with disabilities have acquired the same access to the job market as every one else.
Fact  Employment equity programs have been successful for only a fraction of people with disabilities. The majority is still under unemployed, under-employed and almost invariably under paid.
Myth People with disabilities are all well educated.
Fact  People with disabilities experience a shortfall in education. In fact, literacy is still a critical issue to employability.
Introduction | Getting the Language Right |
Definitions and Contacts | Some Canadian Highlights | Continuing Issues | De-MYTHifing the myths | The challenge

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